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Weekend 101… Jeff Koons: Now

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The renowned Newport Street Gallery presents one of this years most anticipated art exhibitions: Jeff Koons: Now.

Enter a world where themes of culture, stigmas, consumerism and acceptance are explored as you walk through the six galleries located on both floors.

Open until 16th October, the exhibition features Koons’s work between the years of 1979-2014 showcasing some of his most controversial creations throughout the gallery owned by Damien Hirst: a fan and collector of Koons’s work.

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Each room is left minimalistic and clean, allowing a solitary focus on the pieces where some stood alone and others in groups. 

A lump of clay originally created by his own son had become one of the most eye-catching pieces throughout the exhibition. Constructed from aluminum and formed of 27 multi-coloured individual pieces, ‘Play-Doh’ is held together purely by its weight.

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The Three Ball 50/50 Tank addresses themes of social mobility. Created by working with physicist Richard P. Feynman, the distilled water solution allows all three balls to balance perfectly, resting peacefully in the tank. However, this state can be upset by changes in weather experienced in the outside world, highlighting underlying social themes. 

Standing over 15 ft high, the ‘Balloon Monkey’ has a blue shiny, mirrored exterior that aims to remind the viewer of their existence, enticing a complete 360 walk around the inflatable. The tail allows the viewer to connect to their inner sensuality that continues as you enter Gallery 3. Facing a large bowl of eggs and explicit imagery, Koons is keen to remove the stigma and mortification that surrounds sexuality.

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Throughout the entire exhibition, one can’t help but feel a sense of pleasant contradiction. The ‘Popeye’ series features inflatable animals that are personified by filling them with air, a resemblance to the human body, however they are created out of material that is much more durable than skin or the vinyl they appear to be.

 

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Removing these objects from their initial context culminated in pieces; ‘Acrobat’ and ‘Seal Walrus’, which are designed to trick the mind.  Arranged in ways that defy laws of gravity by using such materials calls for credit towards the outstanding artist.

Head down to visit Hirst’s personal collection of Koons’s pieces this weekend at Newport Street Gallery.

Click here for more information.

Image credit: Jeff Koons

 

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