The Language of Flowers

The Language of Flowers

 Spring’s officially in bloom and at Lulu we absolutely adore flowers and the joy they bring. One of our founder’s first designs, The Rose Basket, was inspired by the notion that when she bought a beautiful bunch of flowers she thought it a shame to leave them at home when she went out, wishing she could accessorise with them instead. Flowers have been a big source of inspiration ever since.

 
The great British flower stall is the muse for Spring/Summer 22 featuring floral shades and pretty Cherry Blossom designs. There is also a collaboration with artist Annabel Pearl who has created a range of floral designs adorning bags as well as 3D floral sculptures – the definition of flowers that never wilt. You can see them in our Spring campaign as well as our King Street store which is truly in bloom!
 

But what do the different blooms mean? Did you know that every variety of flower has its own unique symbolism? Read on to find out more about what your favourite flowers represent.



 

  
What are the different tulip colour meanings?
Red tulips are most strongly associated with true love, while purple symbolizes royalty.
 
Fun facts:
There are over 150 species of Tulips and more than 3000 varieties. Their flower buds are known for being almost perfectly symmetrical.
 




 
What do the different colours mean?
White lilies symbolise purity and rebirth; Pink lilies symbolise femininity, admiration; Bright and fiery, the red lily represents love and passion.
 
Fun facts:
There are thought to be 80-100 species of lilies grown natively all over the world. But most commonly, the lily is found in places in the northern hemisphere with balmy temperatures, like Asia, Europe, and North America.
 




 
What do the different colours mean?
Red conveys power and strength to the person receiving the flower as a gift; pink and purple are associated with kindness and grace; white is a symbol of staying focused and pure, whilst the black Dahlia indicates a warning of betrayal.
 
Fun facts:
Some varieties produce flowers up to 12 inches in diameter, and the plants themselves can reach up to six feet high.
 




 
What do the different colours mean?
Red roses convey love and passion; white roses symbolize a new beginning and everlasting love; the yellow rose most commonly means friendship; Orange roses are a symbol of energy and enthusiasm; deep and hot pink roses convey appreciation, gratitude, and recognition.
 
Fun facts:
The ancient Egyptians used roses as offerings to the gods, whilst in England, as early as the 15th century, the English were cultivating roses for their beauty.





 
What do the different colours mean?
A yellow daffodil usually symbolizes rebirth and the arrival of spring; purple daffodils are rare and are said to represent selfishness or self-obsession; white daffodils symbolize purity.
 
Fun facts:
The daffodil belongs to the narcissus genus and get their name from the Greek god Narcissus who was so obsessed with his own reflection in the water that he drowned in an attempt to capture his reflection.
 




 
What do the different colours mean?
White Peonies symbolize bashfulness; pink Peonies symbolize good luck and prosperity and red Peonies represent love, passion, honour and respect.
 
Fun facts:
Peonies date back to 1000BC, a staggering 4000 years ago when they first appeared in Chinese gardens. The peony flower was mainly used as a medicine to treat things like headaches and asthma or even to relieve childbirth pain!





 
What do the different colours mean?
The blue Hyacinth flower is said to represent constancy and sincerity; purple is generally used to symbolize royalty and spirituality; white typically symbolizes innocence and purity.
 
Fun facts:
The Hyacinth came to Europe around 1560 from Turkey, Syria and the Lebanon but it was a couple of centuries before everyone could enjoy them. Around the 17th and 18th centuries hyacinths were so exclusive that only a couple of rich plant lovers had them in their greenhouses.

 



 
What do the different colours mean?
Purple represents wisdom, and respect; blue irises are symbolic of hope and faith; yellow irises symbolize passion.
 
Fun facts:
There are 325 species and 50,000 registered varieties of irises. They range from towering flowers of five feet or more to tiny ‘dwarfs’ less than eight inches tall.





 
What do the different colours mean?
Pink Hydrangeas symbolize heartfelt emotion; blue symbolize frigidity and apology; white represent boasting or bragging.
 
Fun facts:
Hydrangeas are often given on 4th wedding anniversaries to symbolize appreciation and heartfelt emotion.






What do the different colours mean?
The yellow Sunflower is a symbol of joy, optimism and positive energy; red and orange are symbols of passion and strength, while brown and burgundy symbolize loyalty and support for someone you love.
 
Fun facts:
Each sunflower is actually thousands of teeny flowers and the tallest sunflower on record grew over 30 feet tall!





 
What does its colour mean?
Eucalyptus is a unique green with undertones of silver, grey and blue and as a colour it can feel equal parts serene, rejuvenating and invigorating. The colour green signifies nature, life, safety, hope and spring.
 
Fun facts:
There are some 700 varieties of eucalyptus and almost all of them change their leaves over the course of their life. The eucalyptus tree grows quickly - up to 2.5 metres a year.
 
 

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